Work Experience – Photo Shoot

Back in November I was contacted by a model looking for a make-up artist to do her hair and make-up for a shoot for her portfolio. She wanted big sexy hair and glowing skin with a natural eyes. This was my first experience working on a photo shoot, I really enjoy the experience and it is something I would really like to do again. The studios we used for the shoot were RM- Studios in Bradford. Below are some of the final pictures from the shoot.

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Thanks for reading

Hannah xoxo

Work Experience – We Heart Leeds Fashion Show

Back in November , myself and a few of my class mates where asked to help out and do the make-up at a fashion show in Leeds. The fashion show was in aid of helping raise money for The Children’s Heart Surgery Fund. The make-up we had to apply to models was a dark blue/navy smokey eye with a red lip. Over all the night was very fun, and having never worked on a fashion sow before, I found  that I really enjoyed it. The only problem we had on the night was the lighting, while doing the make, as the venue was in a bar, we only had a few spot lights to work with. However, we were able to work with the lighting and all of the make-up turned well. Below are some pictures from the night.

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Thanks for reading

Hannah xoxo

Bridal Hair And Make-up

Another final task for postiche was to add false hair into natural hair, but still making the hair look natural. For this task we had to research the different ways in which false hair is being used currently, and take inspiration to create a hair and make-up for either red carpet or bridal.  For my hair and make-up I decided to choose bridal, as it is an area that I would like to go into in the future. For the hair I wanted a classic and elegant up-do, that flattered my model. Also for the  the make-up I wanted to keep it with the same area as the hair so I kept it natural with what my model usual wears, but with a little extra on the eyes and lips. Below are some pictures of my work.

Thanks for reading

Hannah xoxo

Knotting a Mustache and Final Mustache

As part of one of our final tasks for postiche, we had to create a mustache based on a any style from the 1900-1990. Using the techniques we had practiced in pattern making and knotting,  I decided to create a mustache based on the 1980’s chevron style mustache wore by celebrities such as Tom Selleck. Using the mustache I knotted I decided to create a character of and old man. Overall I am happy with the way my mustache turned out, I am pleased with the colour of the mustache as it matches the hair colour of my models hair. If I were to knot the mustache again I would probably knot more hair into it  as once it was on the models face it look a bit sparse and not as thick as the style should be. Below are some pictures of my mustache and of it on my model. I would also like to thank my dad for agreeing to be my model.

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Final Pictures 

Thanks for reading

Hannah xoxo

Making A Silicone Prosthetic

After completing parts one and two of the face casting process, I then moved on to making my prosthetic. For my prosthetic I decide to sculpt a witches nose and chin, I wanted to base my character on both the witches in the new and old Wizard of Oz films. Below  is a list of the products I used to create my prosthetic as well as the method and pictures.

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Products and Tools needed:

  • 2 strips of Mod rock
  • Petroleum jelly
  • Plaster
  • 2 X 12″ by 12″ of Scrim
  • 3 X Mixing bowl
  • Access to water
  • Chisel
  • Flat wooden board
  • Silicone part A, B and a accelerate
  • Weighing sales
  • 1/2 inch paint brushes
  • Paper towel

Method

  • Build a clay wall similarly to before but this time it was twice as tall. Add a layer of Mod-Roc to provide more strength.
  • Once the wall was complete, paste a thin layer of petroleum jelly all over the exposed plaster on the face cast base, making it easier to separate the top and the bottom part of the mould.
  • Mix up a batch a plaster and added a beauty coat over the top of the sculpture. This is to ensure we get a good coverage of the full sculpt.
  • Pour a little more plaster onto the cast and allowed it to dry for a few minutes. Then add a layer of scrim over the top and added more plaster on top.
  • Poured some more plaster over the top to ensure none of the scrim was visible. Then leave to dry for 1 hour to ensure it is fully set.
  • Once set, remove the clay and Mod-Roc wall and gently file away any rough edges of the plaster with a metal file.
  • Clean out any of the Plasterline. Leave the white top part of the cast to soak in water for around 10 minutes. This is so the silicone doesn’t absorb into the open pours of the plaster. Once soaked pat dry ready for the next step. Finally apply a very light coat of petroleum jelly to act as a releasing agent.  .

Mixing Silicone 

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  • Place the empty plastic bowl onto the scales making sure it is still on 0 (This is so we don’t include the weight of the bowl as the -measurements have to be accurate in order to get a good batch of silicon)
  • Add 500grams of part A of the rubber silicone
  • Add 50grams of part B (Silicone catalyst)
  • Add Desired silicone colour a little at a time
  • Mix the pigment in thoroughly to ensure an even colour throughout the silicone
  • Add 5grams of the accelerent. This allows the silicone to set much quicker cutting the waiting time down dramatically.
  • Mix well
  • Once mixed thoroughly then pour into the top part of the mould
  • Once you are happy with the desired about of silicone immediately sandwich the two parts of the moulds together using the drilled dents as a guide to line it up correctly. You may need to use a clamp at this stage to tighten the two parts together.
  • Allow any excess silicone to drain out. This is a good sign, it shows that the mould is completely filled.
  • Then leave to dry completely for around 30-45 minutes. To tell if it is completely set, is to pour a small mount of silicone on the top of the moulds as this will act as a visible guide.

Final Image

After casting my prosthetic I then had to apply it to my model. Overall I am happy with the way my sculpting turn out as well as the look of it once it was cast. In hindsight I would of probably not have pre coloured my prosthetic,as it didn’t look right when I applied the rest of the make-up to my model.

 

Thanks for reading

Hannah xoxo

Pattern Making and Knotting for Postiche

In our second year of media make up we are being taught postiche. Postiche  is a term used to describes hand knotted false hair. In our first postiche lesson we learnt how to make a pattern for facial hair as well as learn how to knot hair onto netting. Below are the methods for both pattern making and knotting as well as pictures of what i did.

Pattern Making

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Products Used

  • Cling Film
  • Permanent Marker
  • Sticky Tape
  • Scissors

Method

  • Using cling film  place a piece over the jaw making sure it goes under the nose and chin and also making sure it goes ear to ear.
  • Once you have the cling film is in the right place get the model to hold it in place and apply sticky tape to mold the cling film into place so the when it is taken of it is the shape of the models jaw.
  • After applying the sticky tape, take a permanent marker and mark out where the nostrils are ( to give an indicator where to facial patter will line up) as well as marking out the outline of the lips.
  • With sticky tape cover the marker to protect it from rubbing off.
  • Take the cling film face mold  of the face and cut off any excess cling film that is not covered by sticky tape.
  • Draw on the shape of the mustache you want and cut it out
  • Once the shape of the mustache is cut out you are the ready to make your mustache.

Knotting

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Products Used

  • Wooden Board
  • Black Card
  • Sticky Tape
  • Small Pins
  • Small Hammer
  • Hook
  • Netting/Lace
  • Hair

Method

  • Pin a piece of lace/netting to a block, to ensure it is stable pin every half centimeter
  • Hold hook in your dominate hand, like a pencil
  • Fold about 10 hairs over at the root end, fold over around 4 cm and hold tightly 
  • Slide hook under 1 bar of lace/netting
  • Hook the hair over the hook to catch a couple of hairs
  • After catching pull the hook back under the bar bringing the hair with it keeping a good tension.
  • Slide the loop of hair to the corner or curve of the hook and slide the hook forward.
  • Pull the hook with the hair back towards you hand, wrap the hair in your hand over the top of the needle. 
  • Turn the hook away form you 
  • Pull the hair that you just wrapped,through the loop you first made
  • Pull hair part way, tighten the knot with your left hand and pull the rest of the hair through with your right.

Thanks for Reading 

Hannah xoxo

Face Cast Part 2

After completing our initial face cast, our second lesson consisted of  making a base to help keep the cast sturdy while sculpting. Below is the method of how we did it along with some pictures

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Products Used

  • Clay
  • Modrock Plaster Bandage
  • Plaster Dust
  • Wax Loosening Agent
  • Plaster
  • Shellac

Method

  • Dust clay board with plaster dust
  • Slice clay and place on the board and overlap each piece
  • Smash the clay down flat and cut of top with cheese wire to smooth out surface and remove from the board.
  • Place pervious face cast on to a wooden board and draw a circle 2 – 3 inches around it.
  • Soak  face cast in a bowl of cold water (only enough to cover the sides of the mask)
  • Slice the piece of clay into 2-2 ½ inches wide to create a clay wall.
  • Seal clay to the board to prevent leakage
  • Apply Modrock plaster bandage about a foot long and wrap around the clay wall to give it support and strength when the plaster is poured in.
  • Inside of the clay wall paint wax loosening agent onto the board to prevent plaster form sticking
  • Pre-cut  two pieces of scrim about the size of the wooden board
  • Mix up plaster, make it up a little thicken than last time
  • Tip a little plaster into the walls you have just made, add both pieces of scrim and pat down into the plaster so that all edges have been covered and that nothing is hanging over.
  •  Top up with the rest of the plaster but not right to the top, making sure that no scrim is showing – Also shake the plaster to make sure there are no air bubbles and that the plaster is level
  • Place soaked face cast onto the in the centre of the plaster and leave to set
  • If there are any holes around the edge of the face once you have put it in the plaster,  you can fill it in with thicker plaster once the base has almost set
  • Once set remove the clay and modrock wall, file the new cast down to make it smooth and remove any uneven areas on the face.
  • Drill four holes, two on each side which will be used for guidance later on in the process of prosthetics making
  • Apply shellac  all over the cast until shiny
  • Once the shellac is dry you are then ready to sculpt

Thanks for reading

Hannah xoxo